What is a Super?

What is a Super?

Super is short for superstructure, which refers to the boxes placed on a beehive for bees to store honey. Historically, a super was always medium, 6 5/8-inch tall box or a shallow 5 3/4-inch tall box. Both are traditionally referred to as supers, exclusive of the deep 9 5/8-inch box used on the bottom of the hive. 

Bees & Beekeepers: This Months Report

Bees & Beekeepers: This Months Report

Ever want to know what your bees are doing each month? Want to know what beekeepers are supposed to be doing each month to help their bees? Watch our monthly video or better yet, subscribe to our Bees & Beekeepers newsletter to get a more in depth glimpse into your bees each month. 

Foundation Cell Size and Cell Counts, Why it Matters

Foundation Cell Size and Cell Counts, Why it Matters

Many beekeepers use foundation to help the bees, but not all foundation is made the same. Cell sizes differ greatly among brands, as does amount of wax sprayed onto plastic foundation. Smaller cell sizes allow for more eggs to be laid by the queen, creating a more compact brood nest. 

The Fastest Way to Build Bee Frames

The Fastest Way to Build Bee Frames

Showing you how to assembled 50 langstroth frames with foundation with only 25 seconds per frame. We used 1 1/4-inch long staples and Titebond 3 wood glue to assemble them. Each frame is fitted with our heavily waxed foundation with 2x as much beeswax as standard plastic foundation. 

Why use Cypress for Beehives ?

Why use Cypress for Beehives ?

Pine is popular because it is inexpensive, grows quickly and is easy to cut. Cypress is popular as it grows slowly in wet areas, creating a denser wood with tight growth rings and increased durability. The tight rings and the naturally present preservative cypressene minimizes decay, allowing cypress bee hives to last longer than any beekeeper does. Even "new growth" cypress from todays trees carry the same natural preservatives as when cypress trees were first harvested. 

How to Start Beekeeping: Medium or Deep Boxes?

How to Start Beekeeping: Medium or Deep Boxes?

Starting to keep bees requires a lot of  upfront decision making, some are easy to change later than others. Choosing to use all medium boxes or a combination of deep, medium or shallow boxes is decisions that is harder to change later. If you use a combination of sizes, it is difficult to undue that decision and change to only medium boxes. 

Organic Honey

Organic Honey

As of September 2015, honey cannot be certified organic by the USDA. Any certified honey sold in the United States is imported from other countries and certified organic by that country. A US beekeeper can have non-certified organic honey that is raised organically, but it is nearly impossible to actually produce. Read on to know why.

Keeping bees without gloves

Keeping bees without gloves

If a beekeeper can handle working sans gloves, it’s admirable to me. For those who use gloves, working bees without gloves is a great goal to work towards. If you don't know how to read your bees, work them without gloves and they will teach you. 

Sugar Syrup for Bees

Sugar Syrup for Bees

Make sugar syrup for your bees using these easy recipes for 1 gallon or 5 gallons at a time. This guide is for making thin, 1:1 sugar syrup quickly and easily without a mess. Find out how much sugar to feed your bees to equal 1 frame of capped "honey".

When you have a 2 or more hives to feed, we find it easier to make about 5 gallons of syrup at a time, rather than 1 gallon at a time. To do this, we measured out the fill marks on the inside of 2 (5-gallon) buckets. Each bucket has a fill line for the water and a separate fill line for the sugar. 

Packages or Nucleus Hives, which is better?

Packages or Nucleus Hives, which is better?

One of the major questions new beekeepers are faced with. Should I start with a nucleus hive or a package? It's a great question, because they are very different and advice on them abounds. We address the differences and come up with a conclusion to help you make your own conclusion.

10 Topics to Expect on This Blog

10 Topics to Expect on This Blog

10 topics to expect on our blog from top bar hives to bee hive scale data.

Making the most of your time is important to me, so conciseness and on-topic information is my goal. Here are some of the topics you should expect:

  1. Information about current events affecting honeybees
  2. Top bar hive and Langstroth hive management techniques